Linseed

Although linseed (also known as flaxseed) is not a common food in the diet of Australians, it has a long history and has been around for thousands of years. One of the first crops ever grown, the people of Scandinavia, Africa, and Asia eat linseed regularly. Linseed are brown in color and have a deep nutty flavor.

Linseed has a high nutritional value and according to the Tufts University Health & Nutritional Letter, Linseed is one of the richest sources of alpha-linolenic acid, one of the types of fatty acids in the omega-3 family which are considered a superunsaturated fats.

Omega-3 fatty acids help improve heart health by lowering elevated blood fats (serum triglycerides), reducing blood pressure, and platelet stickiness. Other benefits include: reversing premenstrual syndrome in most cases, shortening the time required from tired muscles to recover from exercise, increasing the rate of metabolic reactions in the body at levels above 12 - 15% of total calories, producing smooth skin, increasing stamina, and reducing inflammation. These fatty acids are “essential” for health and survival, but the human body is incapable of producing them; they must be obtained from food.

Linseed is an excellent source of insoluble and soluble fiber which can help decrease cholesterol levels. Linseeds are also packed with Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs), a critical dietary element that regulates the balance of saturated fats and cholesterol in cells. In addition to being found in Linseeds, EFA is found in fish, soybeans, leafy vegetables, nuts, and seeds.

In addition to the omega-3 essential fatty acids and soluble and insoluble fiber, linseeds also contain a phytoestrogen, a naturally occurring plant estrogen, called lignans. In fact, linseeds are one of the richest known food sources for plant estrogens, containing between 75 to 800 times more lignans than any other food.

Lignans are touted as having many health-related benefits including decreasing the symptoms of menopause, particularly hot flashes, and regulating the menstrual cycle.
 

Why not read about our healthy and nutritious breads...

[top]

Other Products
Honey
 

Honey is a source of simple carbohydrates. Its composition on average, is 17.1% water, 82.4 % ....click for more...


Linseed
 

Although linseed (also known as flaxseed) is not a common food in the diet of Australians, it ....click for more...


Oat Seeds
 

OATS/OATMEAL AND DIABETES: Oats now are almost considered a medicinal plant b....click for more...


Poppy Seeds
 

Poppyseeds are relatively high in calcium, which is good for teeth and bones. In China, poppys....click for more...


Rye Seeds
 

The composition and health benefits of rye have actively been studied over a decade in Europe.....click for more...


Seasme Seeds
 

Sesame seeds contain a high and unique protein composition making them a nearly perfect food,t....click for more...


Soya Seeds
 

Packed with nutrition, the soybean is full of protein and is a source rich in iron, calcium, z....click for more...


Sunflower Seeds
 

A Phytochemical Powerhouse New research indicates possible protection against heart disease an....click for more...